Woman who disowned mother fails in claim on estate | STEP

Woman who disowned mother fails in claim on estate | STEP.

 

Conduct does affect the way the court views the situation of a child claiming for support under the IPFDA.  And a letter outlining the reasons for excluding a child has significant weight.

In considering the request, the judge was entitled to consider Wright’s conduct toward her mother – Mary Waters had left a letter explaining her reasons for disinheriting her daughter. A key element was that Mary Waters had sent her daughter GBP10,000 to invest on her behalf in 1998, but Patricia Wright later refused to return this money, insisting that it was a gift. In her letter of wishes, Mary Waters stated: ‘My daughter has already taken without my consent GBP10,000 of my savings’.

There had later been a serious falling-out between mother and daughter on other more personal matters. These quarrels culminated in Patricia Wright sending her mother a letter disowning her and wishing her dead, and stating that she did not wish to communicate with her any more. There was no further contact between them.

One might conclude that if mother and daughter had made it up and become marginally less estranged, the IPFDA letter, if unamended, might have been less effective.

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